How Do I Respond to an Invitation to a Same-Sex Wedding?

How Do I Respond to an Invitation to a Same-Sex Wedding?

How Do I Respond to an Invitation to a Same-Sex Wedding? Factors to Consider

By Harvest USA Staff 

It can be hard as a Christian to know what to do if you are invited to attend a same-sex wedding by a gay friend, a co-worker or a relative. These relationships are not on the same level as someone from your own immediate family, but they are still important. Decisions will need to be made, and you want to convey that you both care for them and that your Christian faith is very important to you, as well.  

Obviously, you need to put some earnest and thoughtful time and prayer into making your decision. Keep in mind that many Christians, even among those who are more conservative and see the Scriptures as wholly authoritative in their lives, approach this decision differently.   Here are some key questions to ask yourself to help you make a decision.

1. What is your current relationship with the person getting married?

Are they a casual co-worker, friend or distant relative, or someone you have a closer, more intimate relationship with? Has the invitation been given to everyone in your office, department or family? Or, has it been given to you because you have a closer relationship? These factors can help you determine how best to respond. For example, if the person is someone you have a good friendship with, then you will most likely speak directly to him or her about the issue of attending. If your friend knows you are a Christian, then this becomes another opportunity to share and discuss together what your faith positions are and what you think is best for you to do.

2. What would you be trying to convey by your attendance?

Some people have made the distinction between supporting the event, which they don’t approve of, and supporting the person getting married, whom they do love and care about. This distinction may depend on how vocal you have been about your Christian faith. What kinds of key conversations have you had with them? Do they know you are a Christian? Do they know your views about homosexuality? If so, your presence could actually “stun” them or really jumble-up the categories they may have about “people” like you. Christians, living intentionally by the gospel, can sometimes be confusing and provocative to people, causing them to rethink their positions. That’s a good thing.

If you feel that attending would advance and actually lend weight and credibility to your Christian witness, then you might decide in that direction. The nature of mercy is that it always discerns; it is not something sloppy or casual, but intentional. Mercy also “disrupts” in order to try to deter someone’s life path towards a new and bigger, eternal direction. So, in attending, you do not want your presence to convey a message that you are culturally “with-it,” or that you are sophisticated enough to have no problem with people who embrace homosexuality. Rather, your attendance would be a calculated step, carefully chosen, that would be in line with your desire to pursue a relationship with this person because you care for them and you care enough for them to keep sharing the gospel with them.

3. What are you concerned about?

Are you afraid that your attendance would communicate your approval (like probably 99% of the people there)? Or, are you afraid of having to explain why you feel you cannot attend? Are you afraid you would not know how to act or how to talk with other guests, most of whom might be gay or, at the least, pro-gay? There can be lots of fear issues involved in having to make this decision. Ask the Lord to guide you regarding these issues to your attending, or to your fears about repercussions from not attending. Fear or anxiety about disappointing someone is never a good motivator. A better question is this: What response of mine might cause further openness to the gospel?

4. Could you substitute something else, other than attending the event?

If, in good conscience, you reach the conclusion that you cannot attend the service, you might consider an alternative response, one that would not violate your faith positions or convey a wrong message, but would still affirm your love and care for the person. For instance, you might consider a card or gift. This would still show your care for them and acknowledge to them that this was an important day for them (it was, but you don’t necessarily have to join-in on the celebration). You could say something like this in the card: “Sorry that I was unable to make it (note: if you are not close to them they do not necessarily have to know why), but I know it was a special day for you and here is a little token of my appreciation and care for you.”

If you are close to the person or couple, but still conclude in good conscience that you cannot attend the wedding, then consider taking them out to lunch or dinner later on. Of course, this may be a tense or uncomfortable get-together, especially if the person who invited you felt hurt by your absence. But a quick follow-up to do this may go a long way toward bringing understanding and another opportunity for you to share both the truth and mercy of the gospel.

5. Do one or both parties claim to be Christians?

Someone once said, “We shouldn’t expect regenerate behavior from unregenerate people.” In other words, we should not be surprised when unbelievers act like unbelievers. If the person or persons getting married are unbelievers, this doesn’t mean you have a green light to attend—but if someone claims to be a Christian and yet is in rebellion to God’s design and intention for how his people should live, and is celebrating it and inviting others to join in, then that is another matter. Some people have come to the conclusion that if the persons are unbelievers there is more decision room for the argument to attend the wedding. But others would argue that even if one of the parties is a confessing Christian, attending would be entering into their delusion that the marriage union is fine with God and is sanctioned by Him.

As you can see, these are hard issues to confront! Your decision must be surrounded with prayer and talked through with some close friends or family members. But know this: that your wrestling with this question of whether or not it would be appropriate to attend is itself evidence of your heart wanting to do the right thing to honor Christ and to open doors for the gospel. Realize that there is no ONE answer to this! You may face other challenges and questions, from co-workers, friends or relatives, regardless of the course you choose. This situation is much like the one the early church faced, when believers were confronted about behavior that some felt was permitted and others did not (eating of meat, setting apart special days, etc). Romans 14 is a chapter that you would do well to read and reflect on as you wrestle with these issues. There will always be a tension between the freedom we have in Christ to do what we have prayerfully considered is permissible and the need to respect the different opinions of others on the same matter, especially when our behavior may deeply impact another believer.

One thing you can count on: like Jesus, you’ll probably be misunderstood regarding the implications of any choice you make. So, when you make your decision, know that you have made it on the basis of what will honor God, and be at peace on that basis.

Post-script: What about a baptism or baby shower?   

Although slightly different, some of the above questions and criteria could be applied toward the invitation to attend a baby shower or a christening or baptism service, when same-sex couples invite you to attend after the birth or adoption of a child. This situation is a bit further removed from a wedding service, when the issue of same-sex marriage is outside of God’s design; but with a child it can be a bit more complicated, as the child is not responsible for the circumstances in which he participates in such events.

Harvest USA
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