Sexting

Atlantic Monthly has a distressing but highly informative article on teen sexting:  “Why Kids Sext:”  http://m.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2014/11/why-kids-sext/380798/

It’s a great read.  But like I said, be prepared to be distressed and a bit unnerved.

It’s not just distressing because teens are taking naked photos of themselves and sending them on to others (usually boyfriends), but what appears to be a “so what” attitude about doing this by these same kids. While the majority of teens who sext do so consensually, there are still terrible unintended consequences that can occur, and the article points out several.  More disturbing are those situations where some teen girls cave in to relentless pressure to send photos to boys. That’s not only manipulative, it can turn criminal when the naked photo of a minor is distributed online.

But in spite of attitudes changing about this activity, one thing also remains:  the double-standard of girls losing out and being shamed, while the boys are seemingly immune from consequences.  In the ongoing descent into sexual chaos which our culture pushes, some things never change.

It’s an article worth reading by every parent.  But what should a parent do once they’ve read it?  Let me give you four ways to respond.

One, I suggest you don’t react in fear and grab your child’s cell phone and demand to look at what’s in it (though you might very much want to do that!).  And, don’t rush to punish your teen if he or she has done something like this.  You won’t win your child’s heart by over reacting, and that’s the key here:  behavior is important (because behavior has real-world consequences), but character is paramount, and helping your child understand her heart is what will ultimately help her to shape her behavior to do what is right (and honor God in the process).

Two, don’t shut down access to technology, either.  Taking away the cellphone or restricting Internet use won’t really work in the long run.  Technology is too embedded in our kids’ lives (and ours), and trying to shut down what is ubiquitous, and what society is increasingly relying on, will only drive your teen underground.  Trying to control our kids’ lives will only train them to be deceptive.  It’s not control you want over your child’s life; it’s involvement in their life.

Three, parents need to wisely interact with their teens regarding their use of technology.  Yes, they need monitoring. They need supervision and guidance.  Think long and hard before giving your young child a smartphone.  They are fun, informative, fascinating—and potentially dangerous.  They can be portals to some of the darkest corners of life. Are your children using smartphones, tablets, laptops, video game devices?  Unless you oversee their usage and know where they are going on the web, they WILL access bad sites, and maybe engage with people, that can seriously harm them.  And you won’t know about any of this, because web browsers are now almost universally private when it comes to concealing the history of accessed websites.  Effective filters and accountability software should be as mandatory in homes as smoke-detectors.  Seriously.

Four, start talking to your children about sex and their sexuality.  The silence of parents is driving our kids to the most broken places on the planet to learn about sex:  from the Internet, and increasingly they are emulating the practices and standards of pornography as being normative for sex.  But God’s message on sex is that it is a gift to be given in a committed, covenantal union between a husband and wife, and that protecting it until that time comes, is not only ideal, it is also realistic.  Not easy in today’s over-sexualized culture, but not unattainable, either.  Honoring God with our sexuality is worth pursuing.  For ourselves; and for our children.

We can help our children navigate this journey.  But they need us to speak up.  They need us to be involved, helping them to see and understand what God has said about using his gift of sex, and how their hearts need continual direction to align their sexuality with sound, wise, life-affirming biblical practices.

The benefits and blessings of managing their sexuality are life-long. When you show them the way, you’ll be learning how to live with this awesome gift, too.

To learn more how to talk to your kids about sex and how to oversee their use of technology, go to   http://harvest-usa-store.com/ and check out Harvest USA’s mini books, like iSnooping on your Kid:  Parenting in an Internet Age and What’s Wrong with a Little Porn when You’re Single? 

 

Harvest USA
About The Author
Nicholas Black is the Education & Resources Director at Harvest USA. Along with being part of the teaching staff, he oversees the writing and editing of all Harvest USA publications. Prior to joining Harvest USA, he was the Shepherding and Children’s Pastor at New Life Presbyterian Church, Glenside, PA for 14 years. He is a ruling elder in the Presbyterian Church in America (PCA). He is married to Nancy, and is father to two adult children.

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