Washed and Waiting by Wesley Hill – Final Part 4

Final Thoughts by Ward Shope

Are Same-Sex Attraction Struggles Unique from Other Struggles?

Wesley Hill begs this question by writing Washed and Waiting.  Hill is an evangelical believer who has chosen celibacy as the biblically faithful response of a person who struggles with same-sex attraction.  His reflections bring God’s word to bear on his own situation and they provide us with ways to think about the issue by faith.  So is his sexual struggle different from the sexual struggle of a person with opposite sex attractions?  I think there are two ways of answering the question.

Ward Shope

YES.  (Culturally)

The church has been slow to address the issue of believers who are seeking to be faithful to Christ, but feel attracted to the same sex.  Instead, the church has often spoken judgmentally about homosexuality in a way that drives these believers underground.  Many Christians may feel that same-sex temptation itself is sinful.  So those who struggle in this way feel alone in their struggles and dare not come to the community for support, prayer, and intimacy.  Even where churches have been more open about helping those who struggle, there is the fear on the part of the strugglers of being stigmatized or labeled in a way that causes others to avoid relationship with them.  Also, if someone comes forward for help, church members really aren’t sure what their response should be.  The church can be a lonely place for the person who struggles with same-sex attraction.  The temptation to drop out of the fellowship is high, which only moves them closer to acting on their temptations.  The unprepared church provides no hope for change or healing for the struggler.

NO. (Biblically)

The Bible speaks about homosexuality in the same way that it talks about adultery, thievery, abuse of alcohol, greed and slander.  “Or do you not know that the unrighteous will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived: neither the sexually immoral, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor men who practice homosexuality, nor thieves, nor the greedy, nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor swindlers will inherit the kingdom of God. And such were some of you. But you were washed, you were sanctified, you were justified in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ and by the Spirit of our God” (1 Corinthians 6:9-11).

All sin can be forgiven in Jesus Christ.  “If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness” (1 John 1:9).  All sinful temptations can be addressed by the gospel.  Most of us struggle with some particularly strong temptation all of our lives, often leading to hopelessness.  The temptations do not have to be sexual.  But for many, sexual temptation is a powerful reality, and it can drive someone to an experience of enslavement.  The process that leads us into sinful behavior—one in which we may not be aware of initially–is the same for all sin according to James.  “Let no one say when he is tempted, “I am being tempted by God,” for God cannot be tempted with evil, and he himself tempts no one. But each person is tempted when he is lured and enticed by his own desire. Then desire when it has conceived gives birth to sin, and sin when it is fully grown brings forth death” (James 1:13-15).

Our desires drive us to believe that the sin will provide something advantageous for us – maybe in a way we don’t believe God can.  The solution to change is also the same for all sin.  As we move deeper into relationship with Christ, our desires are transformed, moving from sinful desire to the godly desire of knowing Christ and living by His Spirit’s desires (Rom 8:1-6).  These desires can always be fulfilled.  So temptation can diminish and lose its controlling power as we move toward Christ in community with other believers.

Hill writes in a way that reflects on the uniqueness of same-sex attraction for a believer in the church, while calling us back to the answer for all sin struggles.  Is it harder for the struggler with same-sex attraction?  Yes and no.

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1 Comment:


  • By silver price 14 Sep 2012

    Having same-sex attraction, though, is unique compared to other forms of temptation. 1 Corinthians 6:18 lends some help: “Flee from sexual immorality. Every other sin a person commits is outside the body, but the sexually immoral personsins against his own body.” Sexual immorality messes with you more than most other sins because it has a much greater power to destroy individuals, families, and churches. Sexual immorality leads to death, warping one’s understanding of God and self. There is a reason almost every New Testament epistle contains warnings against sexual immorality (e.g. 1 Thess. 4:3).

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